Shifting Your Mindset

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tag Responsibility
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The Responsibility Process shows the ways to switch from the Control Cycle into the Power Cycle.

The Control Cycle is a natural reaction to approaching problem solving. It seeks to solve problems by creating compliance with advice and rules that are developed. It only addresses the anxiety; the underlying problem will not be resolved and the problem will return.

The Power Cycle is the desired path to take when approaching problem solving. It derives power from looking at all possible solutions, gaining clarity of the root cause, and then trusting in the solution (as well as those who will implement it).

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This Practice contains guides and videos that will help you make this shift.

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Make a New Choice: Practice the Power Cycle

When we make a new choice to give up control, it allows us to increase power and freedom, and explore new solutions and perspectives of the real problem.

The Power Cycle is our desired approach to problem solving because it...

  • Focuses on revealing the real problem
  • Allows a clarity and understanding of the problem and solution, not just for you, but for all involved in the process.
  • And helps new possibilities emerge.

Find the accompanying guide here

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Make a New Choice: Plan Your Next Steps

Use the workplace situation that you selected in a previous job aid to complete this guide.

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Saying No and Saying Yes: Learn the Difference

Beware of this trap posing as Responsibility:

“I think I’m too responsible because I take on more and more even though I can’t handle it all.”

Taking on too much isn’t Responsibility at all.

Take action here

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Saying No and Saying Yes: Use the Power Cycle

You can use the Power Cycle when looking at what you and others say “yes” to. Utilize the discussion tool below to share the Power Cycle and help someone else take the powerful path when solving problems and operating from true Responsibility.

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Conditioning: Use Nature vs. Nurture to Your Advantage

What do you need to recondition yourself around? What concepts have you learned through traditional management practices or experience that may be getting in your own way of operating from Responsibility and taking a powerful approach to problem solving? Follow the steps below.

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Conditioning: Learn About Nature vs. Nurture

As long as things go wrong, we’re subject to The Responsibility Process.

We’ve been conditioned by well-intentioned individuals to gravitate towards many of the limiting, unresourceful states below the line. We get trapped in them.

We operate and solve problems from a position of control, coping, and tolerance.

Find the accompanying guide here

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Accept Change or Tolerate: Apply Accepting Behaviors

You will encounter individuals tolerating changes at all levels of an organization and within teams. Use this coaching guide to determine where tolerance of and resistance to changes exists as well as when individuals accept change and operate from a Power Cycle and Responsibility mindset.

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Accept Change or Tolerate: Learn the Difference

Change is constant: At work, in your personal life, and in the world.

When we face changes we:

  • React and judge the change as bad
  • Resist it
  • Blame the people behind the change, or
  • Justify it based on circumstances

It is much less often that we embrace the inevitability of change or focus on the larger purpose for the change.

When we resist change, but fail to stop it, then we usually end up tolerating the change. Long-term tolerating is called Obligation.

Take action about this.

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Shame - Obligation - Quit Cycle: Learn About It

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Many professionals hide out in Quit until the Shame of not confronting the problem or not having what they really want kicks in.

Here's the accompanying guide.

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Shame - Obligation - Quit Cycle: Listen and Respond

Utilize the Coaching Guide below when working with others. Develop new responses as you become more comfortable and confident.

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The Upset is Mine: Own the Problem

Our problems are defined internally, not externally. The difference between feeling powerless and powerful is an idea, a thought. That means it is up to you.

By operating from Responsibility we can overcome the upset that comes from within.

When experiencing upsets, we can end up in The Control Prison. Ultimately, this does nothing more than:

  • Temporarily address our anxiety
  • Reinforce past realities, beliefs, and assumptions

Strive to approach problem solving using the Power Cycle.

Take action about this.

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The Upset Is Mine: Make a Chart of Choices

Reflect and take a close look at where you have come from and where you are in your mastery of The Responsibility Process. Additionally, identify the message or experience that you can pass along to others.

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Find the Exit: Rejecting the Story

When intentions meet counter-intentions, we experience emotions of:

  • Upset
  • Anxiety
  • Loss of control

Our own upset is o6en caused by a story that we tell ourselves. To find the exit and get unstuck, we can simply reject this story.

Most of those stories aren’t real; and even if they were a reality, we have the power to change their meaning and ending.

How do you find the exit and reject the story?

  1. Make the intention to change and operate from Responsibility faster and more often.
  2. Be aware of the stories you’re telling yourself when you face upsets, problems, or counter-intentions.
  3. Reject those stories by confronting their limiting thoughts, behaviors, beliefs, actions, and assumptions.

Find the guide here.

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Find the Exit: Coaching Guide

Use the coaching guide below to help others through rejecting the story and finding the exit to their limiting emotions.

While this is one path through a coaching conversation, you should utilize the quesGons and/or techniques that are most appropriate given the situation.

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Hell Yes, Yes, and No: Choose Hell Yes

“Yes!”

  • We say yes to many tasks and commitments through the day, both at work and home.
  • Sometimes, when we encounter a problem we feel we “Have to” confront it.
  • If we say “Yes” without conviction or a larger purpose, we may be in Obligation.

“No!”

  • As professionals, it is often hard to say “No.” It can be even harder with family or friends.
  • Sometimes, saying “No” is the most Responsible choice – it keeps us out of Obligation, and may allow us to focus on a larger purpose or root cause of other issues.
  • Saying “No” too oftn, or saying it to simply avoid shame, obligation, anxiety, or upset may mean we’re in Quit.

“Hell Yes!”

  • Saying “Hell Yes” to something means we really want to do it.
  • We have a better chance of operaAng from Responsibility.
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Hell Yes, Yes, and No: How to Get to Hell Yes

Look at your wants and haves: This may recalibrate and increase awareness of your intentions.

Find the guide here.

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